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Ubisoft Takes The Previous Assassin’s Creed Symphony Organizers To Court

According to the French publisher, Ubisoft the concert promoter has breached the agreement, refuses to acknowledge the termination of the contract and is damaging its relationship with the new licensee behind the Assassin’s Creed Symphony concerts…

 

According to Law.com, Ubisoft has filed a lawsuit against the concert promoter after its 2019 and 2020 Assassin’s Creed Symphony concert series failed to honour the agreement. In the lawsuit, the company led by Yves Guillemot says that Ubisoft signed a contract with Massimo Gallota Productions (their name will be abbreviated as MGP from now on) back in 2018 to create the shows… but Ubisoft terminated the agreement before the first year of the tour was complete.

According to Ubisoft, MGP had violated the contract when they were not granted the agreement to use the French publisher’s trademarks. Minimum quality standards were not met, and royalties were not paid, meaning that MGP expropriated the Assassin’s Creed IP to perform its music, cutting Ubisoft out of the deal. In particular, the French publisher is concerned that MGP registered a domain for the series without asking for permission and repeatedly refused to transfer the URL to Ubisoft after the contract had expired. The site is still active to this day anyway… but it doesn’t seem to have been updated with any new dates at all since the 2019-2020 season, so maybe MGP has given up on it all because of the pandemic?

The French company even pointed out that they signed a new agreement with another licensee to run the Assassin’s Creed Symphony shows last December. MGP even contacted them, saying they still had the right to run the concerts. Ubisoft is therefore suing for, among other things, trademark and copyright infringement, breach of contract and cybersquatting (“according to the United States federal law known as the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, is registering, trafficking in, or using an Internet domain name with bad faith intent to profit from the goodwill of a trademark belonging to someone else“).

So MGP will have a problem, but they have the nerve to say that they are rightfully providing the concerts when they no longer do…

Source: Gamesindustry

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